Setting the Default View on a SharePoint Library

There could be a number of reasons why you would want to change the default view on a SharePoint library. Perhaps you created a new view and want to make it the default. Maybe you created a PowerPivot library and don’t have Silverlight installed. The list could go on. Luckily setting the default view is really simple.

  • Navigate to the library which you would like to change the default view on.
  • From the ribbon select Library then click on the Library Settings option.

DefaultViewLibrarySettings

  • When the library settings appear scroll down to the bottom and locate the Views section. This will list all views available. You can also create a new view here if you would like. Note the column called Default View will indicate which view is currently marked as the default.
  • Click on the name of the view which you would like to be the default. In this example we will choose the All Documents view.

DefaultViewViewList

  • Check the box next to Make this the default view.
  • Click OK

DefaultViewDefaultViewSetting
Now each time I navigate to my PowerPivot library it will load in the All Documents view.
DefaultView

About the author

Bradley Schacht

Bradley Schacht is a Senior Program Manager on the Microsoft Azure Synapse Analytics team based in Jacksonville, FL. He has worked with Microsoft SQL Server and Azure data services since 2009 as a consultant, trainer, and architect. He has co-authored 4 SQL Server and Power BI books, most recently the Microsoft Power BI Quick Start Guide. Bradley enjoys solving interesting problems and teaching others to use new technology. He frequently presents at community events around the country, is a contributor to sites such as SQLServerCentral.com, and is a member of the Jacksonville SQL Server User Group (JSSUG).

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Bradley Schacht

Bradley Schacht is a Senior Program Manager on the Microsoft Azure Synapse Analytics team based in Jacksonville, FL. He has worked with Microsoft SQL Server and Azure data services since 2009 as a consultant, trainer, and architect. He has co-authored 4 SQL Server and Power BI books, most recently the Microsoft Power BI Quick Start Guide. Bradley enjoys solving interesting problems and teaching others to use new technology. He frequently presents at community events around the country, is a contributor to sites such as SQLServerCentral.com, and is a member of the Jacksonville SQL Server User Group (JSSUG).

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